small change: your purpose, strategy & behaviour (PSB)

CiaranLinkedIn

small change 

by 

Ciarán Fenton

How small changes in your behaviour will have a big impact on how you work, lead or follow

That’s the working title of a book I’m writing, initially as a series of short blogs.

Blog 1 small change: seven principles

Blog 2 small change: your career is a unique business

Blog 3 small change: your soft balance sheet

Blog 4 small change: your D Liability

Blog 5 small change: your timeline

Blog 6 small change: your formative years

Blog 7 small change: your A asset

Blog 8 small change: your career equity

Blog 9 small change: your curriculum vitae

Blog 10 small change: your emotional intelligence

Blog 11 small change: your reputation

Blog 12 small change: you, three from now

Blog 13 small change: your purpose, strategy & behaviour (PSB)

You

Seven principles

Principle 1

Your career is

  • a unique business,
  • one over seven billion in its uniqueness

 

Blog 13  small change: your purpose, strategy & behaviour (PSB)

 

Purpose (P)

Your purpose, in career terms, is about why you do what you do.

For you, is your purpose

  • To make money?
  • To make “a difference”?
  • To be the best at what you do?

All three?

Or something else?

Or are you unclear, drifting or just getting by?

The process of finding a purpose is a purpose, provided there’s a reasonable time limit on your reflections, so if you are searching for answers then you have a purpose.

 

Strategy (S)

Your strategy is about how, in broad terms, you will achieve your purpose.

“Strategy” is one of the most abused words in the dictionary. Some people think it’s a plan. Others think it’s behaviour. It’s neither.

A strategy describes how you will achieve an objective.

That’s it on strategy.

 

Behaviour (B)

I use the word behaviour to embrace all plans and approaches to implementing a strategy to achieve a purpose.

Three simple words.

Together they are powerful.

What’s your PSB?

 

Ciarán Fenton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

small change: you, three years from now

CiaranLinkedIn

small change 

by 

Ciarán Fenton

How small changes in your behaviour will have a big impact on how you work, lead or follow

That’s the working title of a book I’m writing, initially as a series of short blogs.

Blog 1 small change: seven principles

Blog 2 small change: your career is a unique business

Blog 3 small change: your soft balance sheet

Blog 4 small change: your D Liability

Blog 5 small change: your timeline

Blog 6 small change: your formative years

Blog 7 small change: your A asset

Blog 8 small change: your career equity

Blog 9 small change: your curriculum vitae

Blog 10 small change: your emotional intelligence

Blog 11 small change: your reputation

Blog 12 small change: you, three from now

You

Seven principles

Principle 1

Your career is

  • a unique business,
  • one over seven billion in its uniqueness

 

Blog 11  small change: you, three years from now

your career equity

How will your career equity look in three years time?

To what extent, if at all, will you curriculum vitae (CV), emotional intelligence (EQ) and reputation (PR) have changed? Will you be in the same job? If not, where will you be? Will your move be by choice?

Will you have changed at all in terms of your behaviour? Will your reputation be precisely the same as it is now or different?

To what extent do you feel that you can control the arc of your career over the next three years? Two years is too short a horizon and five too long.

To the extent that you can control your context, it will be through small changes in the development of your emotional intelligence (EQ) that will most likely help you get to what you want.

Specifically, that means increasing the extent to which you empathise with others, deepening your self-awareness and changing the manner in which you get your needs met so that it becomes more productive for all involved with you. This last is the most important driver of positive change.

If you can confront how best to achieve meeting your needs, then the rest of the changes will follow more easily.

Three questions:

  1. What do you need, rather than want, over the next three years?
  2. Why?
  3. How?

 

Ciarán Fenton

 

 

 

small change: your reputation

CiaranLinkedIn

small change 

by 

Ciarán Fenton

How small changes in your behaviour will have a big impact on how you work, lead or follow

That’s the working title of a book I’m writing, initially as a series of short blogs.

Blog 1 small change: seven principles

Blog 2 small change: your career is a unique business

Blog 3 small change: your soft balance sheet

Blog 4 small change: your D Liability

Blog 5 small change: your timeline

Blog 6 small change: your formative years

Blog 7 small change: your A asset

Blog 8 small change: your career equity

Blog 9 small change: your curriculum vitae

Blog 10 small change: your emotional intelligence

Blog 11 small change: your reputation

You

Seven principles

Principle 1

Your career is

  • a unique business,
  • one over seven billion in its uniqueness

 

Blog 11  small change: your reputation

your-career-equity pr

Your reputation is the third and final component fo your career equity.

In my model, I call it “your PR” as in the “public relations” of the business of your career, since your career is a unique business.

Do you know what your reputation is?

When I ask clients this question a surprising number, to me at least, don’t know what the reputational consensus of third parties is about them.

Does it matter what others feel about you?

Some people don’t care. Famously, according to some historians, Margaret Thatcher lost her beloved job as PM, tearfully, in part because she failed to care what her MPs felt “in the tearooms”.

More recently, in a BBC documentary on Theresa May, one of her close advisers said: “What people don’t understand about Theresa is that she genuinely doesn’t care whether you like her or not”.

So many people do very well indeed by not caring about their reputation, but only up to a point.

For most of us, however, we have to care and indeed at an ethical level, we should care. We live in a society – despite Mrs Thatcher’s incorrect assertion that “there’s no such thing as society” – and to function in it we at least need to understand the impact we are having.

In career terms, therefore, if you don’t know what your reputation is, then it’s in your interests to find out.

It’s easy: just ask enough colleagues what people say about you behind your back until you are clear on the consensus.

Usually, you’ll find they are saying something like “you are great at x, y and z but…”

What’s your “but”? It will be behavioural and you need to know.

 

Ciaran Fenton

 

 

small change: your emotional intelligence

CiaranLinkedIn

small change 

by 

Ciarán Fenton

How small changes in your behaviour will have a big impact on how you work, lead or follow

That’s the working title of a book I’m writing, initially as a series of short blogs.

Blog 1 small change: seven principles

Blog 2 small change: your career is a unique business

Blog 3 small change: your soft balance sheet

Blog 4 small change: your D Liability

Blog 5 small change: your timeline

Blog 6 small change: your formative years

Blog 7 small change: your A asset

Blog 8 small change: your career equity

Blog 9 small change: your curriculum vitae

Blog 10 small change: your emotional intelligence

You

Seven principles

Principle 1

Your career is

  • a unique business,
  • one over seven billion in its uniqueness

 

Blog 10  small change: your emotional intelligence

your career equity

Your emotional intelligence (EQ) is the second key component of your career equity.

In my work I address three EQ issues:

  1. Empathy
  2. Self-awareness-
  3. Your ability to have your needs met, productively

 

Empathy

Empathy, according to the Cambridge English Dictionary,  is “the ability to share someone else’s feelings or experiences by imagining what it would be like to be in that person’s situation”.

It is not to be confused with sympathy. You can be empathetic with someone but not sympathetic towards them.

On a scale of zero to ten, where ten is highly empathetic and zero is not at all – how empathetic are you, your boss, your colleagues?

Self-awareness

The dictionary definition is: “good knowledge and judgment about yourself”. How good is yours?

Your ability to have your needs met, productively

Usually, I find this to be the most complex issue of the three in helping people develop their emotional intelligence because getting one’s needs met is at the heart of all conflict and all cooperation.

I use a “tool” – FEEL/NEED/DO – which has been developed by others, most notably Marshall Rosenberg in Non-Violent Communication, to help people work through three steps:

  1. What do you feel in relation to the issue at hand?
  2. What do you need in relation to that feeling?
  3. What can you do (options) to meet you need to address your feeling?

Try it out on the next matter of conflict you encounter at home or at work.

References

Nonviolent Communication — A Language of Life (Nonviolent Communication Guides)
https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/189200528X/ref=cm_sw_em_r_mt_dp_U_3yggEbMAJ4G0N

Basics of Nonviolent Communication, by Marshall Rosenberg

 

Daniel Goleman on Emotional Intelligence

 

small change: your curriculum vitae

CiaranLinkedIn

small change 

by 

Ciarán Fenton

How small changes in your behaviour will have a big impact on how you work, lead or follow

That’s the working title of a book I’m writing, initially as a series of short blogs.

Blog 1 small change: seven principles

Blog 2 small change: your career is a unique business

Blog 3 small change: your soft balance sheet

Blog 4 small change: your D Liability

Blog 5 small change: your timeline

Blog 6 small change: your formative years

Blog 7 small change: your A asset

Blog 8 small change: your career equity

Blog 9 small change: your curriculum vitae

You

Seven principles

Principle 1

Your career is

  • a unique business,
  • one over seven billion in its uniqueness

 

Blog 9  small change: your curriculum vitae

your career equity

Your curriculum vitae is a key component of your career equity.

The purpose of your cv is to demonstrate, rather than assert, your competence to its readers – prospective employers, headhunters and their key-word search databases.

Assertions include:

  • dynamic
  • inspirational
  • strategic (whatever that means)

If you are any of these, your cv should demonstrate it, or your referees should say it but it’s not in your interests to write it down in your cv.

For that reason, in respect of the scores of curriculum vitae that I have marked-up over many years helping senior leaders find new roles or launch portfolio careers, I always deleted the opening “summary” paragraph beloved by so many, especially those who have not “applied for a job in years”.

If you write down that you were a CEO from x to y date you don’t need to tell us what an average CEO does. We know.

They are terrified of underselling. Yet these unnecessary paragraphs often written by excellent leaders but without Tolstoyesque writing skills are unnecessary at best and damaging at worst.

Let your cv speak for itself and trust that the reader is capable of making reasonable deductions from a simple list of dates – including months with absolutely no gaps since leaving school or university – organisations, roles and a list of achievements, each on one line starting with a strong verb, for example:

  • launched
  • led
  • closed
  • integral to achieving (if part of a team)
  • developed
  • increased
  • reduced

Two pages tops. Arial 11 or 12 is my preferred font.

The cv should include a summary of your education but not your interests because you can’t risk the readers’ possible negative reaction to any of these.

Above all, don’t confuse a curriculum vitae with a covering letter. The former is a verifiable list, the latter a selling document.

Finally, many a role is lost before a selection process is barely underway, sadly, because people forget that the purpose of a cv and a covering letter is to secure a meeting, not a job.

 

Ciarán Fenton

small change: your career equity

CiaranLinkedIn

small change 

by 

Ciarán Fenton

How small changes in your behaviour will have a big impact on how you work, lead or follow

That’s the working title of a book I’m writing, initially as a series of short blogs.

Blog 1 small change: seven principles

Blog 2 small change: your career is a unique business

Blog 3 small change: your soft balance sheet

Blog 4 small change: your D Liability

Blog 5 small change: your timeline

Blog 6 small change: your formative years

Blog 7 small change: your A asset

Blog 8 small change: your career equity

You

Seven principles

Principle 1

Your career is

  • a unique business,
  • one over seven billion in its uniqueness

 

Blog 8 small change: your career equity

your career equity

Your career equity is a function of your Curriculum Vitae (CV), Emotional Intelligence (EQ) and Reputation (PR).

Your curriculum vitae (CV)

Your CV, or resumé, is a list of dates, organisations, titles and achievements and education – no more nor no less. It’s isn’t an opportunity to declare that you are “dynamic and thrusting” nor is a document that can be shaped for a particular role. It is what it is.

 

Your emotional intelligence (EQ)

For me, EQ is about three issues:

  1. Empathy
  2. Self-awareness
  3. Your ability to have your needs met, productively

 

Your reputation (PR)

Your reputation is the consensus amongst other people about you which they express behind your back and sometimes but not always to your face.

 

I call the intersection of these three components your “career equity” to date. Can you populate your career equity list for Now? Do you know how you would like it to read NOW + Three Years?

 

Ciarán Fenton

 

small change: your A asset

CiaranLinkedIn

small change 

by 

Ciarán Fenton

How small changes in your behaviour will have a big impact on how you work, lead or follow

That’s the working title of a book I’m writing, initially as a series of short blogs.

Blog 1 small change: seven principles

Blog 2 small change: your career is a unique business

Blog 3 small change: your soft balance sheet

Blog 4 small change: your D Liability

Blog 5 small change: your timeline

Blog 6 small change: your formative years

Blog 7 small change: your A asset

You

Seven principles

Principle 1

Your career is

  • a unique business,
  • one over seven billion in its uniqueness

 

Blog 7 small change: your A asset

Your sidt balance sheet

 

Your A asset in your soft balance sheet is that skill, competence, or passion, which is hidden within you but which is accessible by making small changes to your D liability

To illustrate: Case Study 1 – The Micro-Managing CEO Part 2

Many years ago, I worked with a board whose CEO was a self-confessed micro-manager. I have worked with many of these, but this particular CEO was unusual in that

a) he acknowledged “his D Liability.”

b) he had high emotional intelligence (EQ) and knew why he behaved in that manner – it was because, in his formative years, his parents would not tolerate failure of any kind in any context. He, therefore, decided not to trust anyone because he felt that he couldn’t entirely rely on anyone to do anything which might impact him without his constant oversight. This behaviour persisted into adulthood, and

c) he was gloriously up for small change.

He agreed to micro-manage a minimum of ten times less out of every hundred interactions. That’s just 10% small change.

After a while, I asked him how he was getting on. He said [and my interpretation]:

  • “I reckon that I’ve clearly beaten your 10% target because definitely, I’m micro-managing at least 20% less!” [competitive, or what?!}
  • “The management team is much happier” [no kidding!]
  • “I have more time” [Of course. Micro-manging is hugely time-consuming and exhausting for the micro-manager]

He had accessed his A asset, which was to trust people more and to take more risks by making small changes in his micro-managing D liability.

That shift took great courage.

Why is it an “asset”?

It’s an asset because he was able to exploit his newfound ability – albeit tenuous – to trust people more and to take more risks with people for his own and their benefit and fulfilment and for the benefit of his organisation.

What A asset do think your D liability is hiding?

 

Ciarán Fenton